7 Safe Shoulder Exercises You Can Do Without Risk

7 Safe Shoulder  Exercises You Can Do Without Risk

7 Safe Shoulder Exercises You Can Do Without Risk

Abigail Scott

Abigail Scott
Mother, Professional Kayaker, and Software Engineer

Updated on 12/6/2022

Medical professionals have a consensus that the shoulder is the most vulnerable joint in the human body. Because it has such a remarkable range of motion, athletes can use it to accomplish a wide variety of activities, such as swinging a racquet or throwing a baseball. Safe shoulder exercises of these movements include: On the other side, the structure's support is mainly provided by its muscle and connective tissue components.

Shoulders involved in overhead sports like baseball, tennis, or playing quarterback in football (QB) may be subjected to a large degree of wear and tear due to the activity. Examples of these activities include. Even in relatively small muscles and tendons, it is possible for there to be impingement, and there is a chance that the support structures will become less stable over time.

Safe sholder

Safe sholder

As a result, you need to ensure that you are always very cautious when you are engaging in any workouts involving your shoulders. It would be best if you worked on improving your shoulder strength, but you can't do so in a method that puts unnecessary strain on your shoulders. In an ideal world, you would strengthen them in a way that would boost your performance while also lowering the likelihood that you would be injured.

In the following article, you will find seven exercises that will assist you in strengthening your shoulders in a manner that is both efficient and risk-free.

Neutral-Grip Overhead Press

Neutral-Grip Overhead Press

Neutral-Grip Overhead Press

Everyone with a remote possibility of developing a shoulder injury should steer clear of overhead presses at all costs. The majority of people agree with this assessment. Because an external rotation of the shoulders is a component of both the Military Press and the Dumbbell Overhead Press, this observation is relevant to both exercises. That places you in a vulnerable position anatomically and raises the risk of you experiencing pain or inflicting an injury on yourself; this is especially true if you participate in a sport that requires you to perform overhead movements, such as pitching, quarterbacking, or tennis, among other sports.

However, we can't just gloss over the delts, one of the muscle groups that this form of exercise works very effectively on the building. Developing those delts is one of the goals of this type of workout. Tony Gentilcore, the co-founder of Cressey Sports Performance in Hudson, Massachusetts, and an authority on training baseball players, recommends making a little tweak to the workout to accommodate your shoulders. Instead of the more common overhand hold, he suggests employing a neutral grip, in which your palms are turned to face each other.

"A neutral grip tends to be a bit more shoulder friendly because there's a little more leeway or wiggle area within the acromial space," says Gentilcore. "This is because there's a little more room to move around within the acromial region." Because of the impingement that can take place in this area, it is very typical for people to sustain injuries to their rotator cuffs in this area.

Kettlebell Shoulder Packing

Kettlebell Shoulder Packing

Kettlebell Shoulder Packing

Most exercises, such as push-ups and bench presses, will focus on working out the front part of your shoulders. As a consequence of this, it is relatively uncommon for athletes to focus an abnormally high level of emphasis on the front of their shoulders while ignoring the side of their shoulders that face the back.

According to Brandon McGill, director of performance at STACK Velocity Sports Performance, having a weak rear of the shoulder will not slow down the arm, whether throwing, hitting a ball, or swinging a racquet. According to him, a soft end of the shoulder makes it impossible to throw, smash a ball, or turn a racquet. "This can present a problem," he says. "whether throwing or striking a ball or swinging a racquet." Because the brain is aware that it cannot use the brakes, McGill's theory states that it will not allow the pace of travel to exceed the braking capacity.

The Kettlebell Shoulder Packing exercise targets the posterior aspect of the shoulder and forces the shoulder into the most advantageous position from which it can perform its function. This exercise, which trains the rear element of the shoulder, is one that Coach McGill has his players perform so that they can address the imbalance that has been identified. In the end, having a solid shoulder rear will enable you to do your talents at faster speeds because it will allow you to maintain control over the action and help you accomplish your skills at higher rates.

Bottoms-Up Kettlebell Press

Bottoms-Up Kettlebell Press

Bottoms-Up Kettlebell Press

On the flip side, many athletes can complete overhead exercises, but they don't do them the right way. By shrugging their shoulders and failing to engage their rotator cuffs, they are creating instability in their shoulders and making the problem worse.

The exercise known as the Kettlebell Bottoms-Up Press is the one that will fix this problem. According to Mike Boyle, co-founder of Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning in Woburn, Massachusetts, holding the kettlebell in a bottoms-up way causes your rotator cuff to activate instinctively. When you have the kettlebell in this manner, your shoulder works hard to regulate a motion from side to side, and this is why this causes shoulder pain.

Boyle claims, "You can have someone who says, 'my shoulder hurts when I press overhead,' and you can give them the Bottoms-Up Kettlebell Press, and they'll look at you like its magic."

Face Pulls

Face Pulls

Face Pulls

It has been suggested by a well-known physical therapist the name of Mike Reinold, that face pulls should be performed to strengthen the posterior side of the shoulder. Your shoulders and your back mainly do the posture of your arms as you draw toward your face because your shoulders are closer to your face.

This move has multiple purposes and can be executed with a cable or a resistance band. You can do it at the beginning of your workout as a warm-up exercise, or you can do it later in your training as a strength move. In either case, it will make your workout more effective. Make sure that your shoulders are pulled back and down while pulling something. You may slouch while performing this workout, which is detrimental because it encourages poor posture.

Pallof Press

Pallof Press

Pallof Press

Your shoulder muscles highly influence your shoulder's health and capacity to perform. Exercises that focus on your core, which offer a solid foundation for your shoulders, are equivalent.

The Pallof Press can work with a variety of different formats. According to McGill, "Although the Pallof Press is not exactly a workout for the shoulders, it improves shoulder stability while keeping the core supported." (Even though this is not primarily a shoulder exercise)

Perform the exercise according to McGill's instructions and hold each repeat for three seconds. You will be able to target your shoulders more than you would be able to with the traditional version of the exercise. Once you have reached the position you started, bring your shoulders down and back, and then maintain that stance for three seconds.

Single-Arm Landmine Press

Single-Arm Landmine Press

Single-Arm Landmine Press

Some athletes have mobility restrictions, such as tight lats or an inflexible t-spine, which causes their back to arch and ribs to flare out when they lift overhead. Other athletes don't face these kinds of mobility restrictions. If you fall into this category, you should avoid overhead lifting at all costs, even if you use a neutral grip on the object you are lifting. You have first to demonstrate that you are deserving of the privilege of being allowed to take part in it.

You are in luck since the Single-Arm Landmine Press allows you to keep training your shoulders like before. Gentilcore believes that athletes must be able to get overhead and have the capacity to rotate their shoulder blades upward. It has been determined that The Landmine Press is the best way to resolve this compromise.

When you lift something at an angle rather than straight over and maintain a controlled range of motion, you put the shoulder in the best position possible for it to perform its function. That is because lifting something at an angle puts less strain on the shoulder than lifting something straight over. In addition, it removes any potential of being limited in one's ability to move around.

Floor Press

Floor Press

Floor Press

If you put a lot of stress on your shoulders or if you are currently battling a shoulder problem, the Bench Press is not the best exercise for you to practice at this time. It can be challenging to master the bench press with significant weight over one's entire range of motion, even when the movement is performed correctly.

Because of safe shoulder exercises, Reinold prefers performing the Floor Press because, in his opinion, it can develop the front part of the shoulder in an effective and safe manner. How does it differ from the typical Bench that is always used? Because of the floor, a limit is placed on the range of motion that your shoulders may accomplish. According to Reinold, it is "very safe" and may be used on a greater variety of shoulder types because you can't reach too far into the shoulder. That makes the procedure applicable to a broader range of shoulder conditions.